Texas Child Support Calculator


Income
Federal income tax-
Medicare-
Social Security-
Union dues-
Health insurance-
Monthly Net Resources
Child support factor%
GUIDELINE SUPPORT
(Based on the first of monthly net resources and the tax tables.)

Important Terms

"Gross Income from Employment"

All income that you receive and which is subject to Social Security and/or Medicare taxes. For most people, this means your gross salary. For example, if you make $50,000 a year and an average bonus of $2,000, you would enter "52000" and select "per year" in the drop down. If you are paid by the hour, take the average number of hours you work each week, multiply that by your hourly rate, and enter that number in the box, then select "weekly" from the dropdown.

"All Other Income"

All income that you receive that is NOT subject to Social Security and/or Medicare taxes. For example, rental income, interest income, dividend income, gift income, etc. If you have expenses against that income, such as the cost of carrying the rental property, subtract those expenses from "all other income" before you enter the number. For example, if you receive $1,000 per month in rental income, but your house payment, taxes, insurance, and HOA fees are $850 per month, enter "150" in the box and select "per month" from the dropdown. If you receive a $5,000 dividend check each year, enter "5000" and select "per year" from the drop down.

"Union Dues"

If you pay union dues, enter the average amount of dues you pay each month.

 

"Health Insurance for the Children"

Enter the amount that you pay each month to provide health insurance for the children. This amount only includes the amount you pay for the children before the court. For example, suppose you are single and your employer would charge you $300 per month to insure just yourself and $450 per month to insure you and your children. If the only children you have are the ones involved in this lawsuit, then you would enter "150" in the box and select "per month" from the dropdown. (450-300 - 150).

However, if you also insure children that are not before the court, the amount you pay for the children must be prorated amongst all children. For example, say you have remarried and you have 2 children with your new spouse and you have 3 children that are involved in this lawsuit. You are paying to insure 5 children total. If your employer would charge you $450 per month to insure just you and your spouse and $600 to insure you, your spouse, and all 5 children, then the total cost of insuring all children is $150. You then divide $150 by the total number of children (5) and multiply that number by the number of children before the court (3). In this case $150 / 5 = $30; $30 * 3 - $90. You would enter "90" in the box and select "per month" from the dropdown.

"Are You Self-Employed"

Enter "NO" if you are paid on a W-2 basis and "YES" if you are paid on a 1099 basis. This allows the calculator to correctly take self-employment taxes into consideration.

"Children Before the Court"

Enter the number of children involved in this lawsuit.

"Number of Other Children You Support"

Enter the number of other children for whom you have a LEGAL OBLIGATION to support, less the children involved in this lawsuit. For example, if you have 5 total children--2 with your new spouse and 3 involved in this lawsuit--you would enter "2" in this box.

Client Login